Saturday, October 18, 2014

Book Review: Damascena by Holly Lynn Payne

DAMASCENA - The Tale of Roses and RumiDamascena: The Tale of Roses and Rumi
by Holly Lynn Payne 
Release Date: June 5th, 2014
Publisher: Skywriter Books
Paperback, 342 pages
Genre: Historical Fiction
Retrieve a Copy:
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Goodreads Summary: Holly Payne’s spellbinding tale brings the unparalleled poet, Mevlana Rumi, to life, and transports readers to the enchanting world of 13th century Persia. Simply but elegantly told, the story unravels the mystery surrounding a legendary orphaned girl, who discovers her gift of turning roses into oil. Named after the flowering rosa damascena, the girl reluctantly assumes the role of a living saint for the miracles she performs—longing for the only one that matters: finding her mother. Deeply wounded by the separation since birth, Damascena undergoes a riveting transformation when she meets Rumi and finally discovers the secret of the rose. 

Imbued with rich historical research and inspired by the devastating disappearance of Rumi’s most lauded spiritual companion, Shams of Tabriz, Holly Payne has courageously opened herself to receive Rumi’s teachings and offer a timeless love story. Inspiring and magical, the story of Damascena transmits the wisdom of the heart, inviting us to transform our pain into love.

Cindy's Review: 
**Copy provided via the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are mine alone.** 
At a Glance/The Cover:
I absolutely love historical romance. The gentlemen back then are sooo much proper than the cocky, arrogant guys nowadays.

This book sounded very poetic and rosey. :) I expected some romance and some drama. Some more poems and flowers. 

Before reading this, I had no idea who Rumi was, but Damascena gave a great image. 

The Characters/My Opinion:
Damascena - As readers, we follow Damascena's journey, from since she was born to a young lady. Damascena doesn't know her destiny and fate. She was raised by Ivan, who was a young man, working in the chapel. He later was so filled with jealousy and hate that he became evil and possessive of Damascena. That's when she left, and her adventure begins.

There are so many people worth mentioning but one of the most important ones includes Shams, who appeared to Damascena in time of need. He was like a teacher, a master who aided her with her knowledge of roses. It was him who allowed her to see her true talent. 

As time went on, Damascena continued on her journey and met Rumi, the legendary poet, greatly respected by many. How she got there? It kind of explains it in the beginning, but you probably won't understand untill the end. At Rumi's, Damascena continues to find her true self and the secret of the roses. There, Damascena matures even more. 

By this part of the book, I really thought Rumi was her soul mate. And apparently, he is. But he had a wife. And he was probably like 50 years older than her. I thought it was weird. And their romance was a bit questionable. Although there was a deep relationship going on between Damascena and Rumi, it wasn't the romantic type of love. It was the deep, understanding kind of love. Someone that understands your soul. 

Overall Thoughts: 
This novel itself was like poetry, with a gentle breeze of words making up a novel. Although I'm not the type to read these deep down novels.....I can't even explain it. It's like those soothing music you listen to when you're sad or nostalgic, helping you remember yourself and everything you want to recall. It kind of also reminds of meditating, with wind breezing by on a cool day. Very peaceful.....that kind of feeling. Like the close your eyes and breathe in and breathe out. 

Damascena took me to places I've never been to before. The 13th century of Persia turns to be pretty fascinating. It was a fun read, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. :)

The Rating: (1-10): 7~
**Sorry that my review is all over the place today. I took the PSATs this morning and I think that just fried my brain. UGH.**

Happy Reading~

2 comments:

  1. Glad you liked this so much, I love a good historical every now and then as well for the same reasons.

    ReplyDelete

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